music and its dance ~ an Africa-centered s/hero's journey perspective

Archive for the ‘Pop Music’ Category

HaNtu: Afrofuturism “In the Stone”

~ Posted in honor of African-American Music Appreciation Month, June 2017 ~

“The artist is meant to put the objects of this world together in such a way that through them you will experience that light, that radiance which is the light of our consciousness and which all things both hide and, when properly looked upon, reveal. The hero journey is one of the universal patterns through which that radiance shows brightly.” [Joseph Campbell, Pathways to Bliss] (more…)

Purple Reign ~ Royal African Symbols

A color with mystical and noble qualities, purple/violet is associated with royalty, spirituality, creativity, and magic. Representing the upper end of the visible color spectrum of Light, purple/violet is both a completion (spiritual mastery) as well as a beginning of the energy vibration beyond the physical. prince on guitarThis is the energy field in which one realizes the eternal union that exists between one’s self and the All (one’s infinite/higher/pure consciousness) – which is the goal of the soul’s journey in this life and beyond. Purple/violet governs the crown chakra, at the top of the head…

This post offers a brief look at the symbolism and meaning in the crowns worn by some of Africa’s royalty – gods and goddesses from Kemet (ancient Egypt) – along with some of the fundamental cultural wisdom that governs their being and evolution. It’s posted during  African American Music Appreciation Month (June), in remembrance of the late Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016 … “Sometimes It Snows In April”) – music genius who identified with royal symbols of purple/violet “reign.” This post honors the god(dess) who meets, supports and delivers us with such gifts as music and more in our epic life quest for truth/consciousness/light, repair, and harmony. (more…)

“I AM ~ SOMEBODY!” – Graffiti as Cultural Text

"I Am - Somebody!"“I Am – Somebody!” is a praise poem to African-Americans written in the 1950s by Reverend William H. Borders, Sr., Wheat Street Baptist Church pastor and civil rights activist. The poem is most often associated with the Reverend Jesse Jackson (more…)

Emcees ~ Unmasking the Trickster Deity

“With this breath I thee wed, my true nature… my forever… my being. With this breath I say ‘yes,’ and I embrace that which is real within me ~ All that is great within me; all that is beautiful; all that is self-love and gratitude; all that is divine…” (Dion Mial / Michael Bernard Beckwith – lyrics)

In Africa the word is endowed with the generative potential of a seed through the concept of nommo ~ spirit breathing life into the universe through its audible articulation or call. (more…)

Master Drummers ~ The Gods Are Awake!

Mother Africa

Mother Africa

“Strummin’ my pain with his fingers, singin’ my life with his words… Killin’ me softly with his song…” (Roberta Flack).  

In Africa it is said that each person has a rhythm to which they alone dance.  Women of certain groups will gather around an expectant mother to pray and meditate until they hear “the song of the child.” Abbreviated in the name that child will be given, this song is chanted in the village to begin their education after they are born. (more…)

Towards an Africa-centered and pan-African theory of Communication: Ubuntu and the oral-aesthetic perspective

rcsa20-v038-i02-coverABSTRACT ~ This article supports scholarly findings that Bantu traditions are among the strongest civilizing forces in the United States. Positing pop music as a paradigm of proof, the author argues for a cultural decolonization and corrective understanding of this expression as a manifestation of Africa’s oral traditions and the global agency of the continent’s cultural custodians. (more…)

UBUNTU: “Two Birds” ~ by Michael Jackson

“Two Birds” ~ Michael Jackson

from

Michael Jackson, Dancing the Dream ~ Poems and Reflections (NY: Doubleday, 1992) (more…)

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