African Liberation Day ~ 5/25

On May 25th (“5/25”) 2020, two recorded events made headlines in the African Diaspora. Both were horrific in the degree to which they were racially-charged and played out from the standpoint of white privilege and callousness against black lives. One was a blatant attempt to provoke a potentially dangerous police-confrontation against an innocent bird-watcher (Christian Cooper) in New York’s Central Park; and the other which demonstrated that potential when George Floyd lived his final 8m:46s under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer. Unfortunately, such occurences as these are not uncommon, and the long list of African victims goes back to the era of slavery whose evils live on and play out in toxic ways from that unexorcised and overly-policed space which nonetheless claims to be the land and home of the free and brave. Officially commemorated as Memorial Day, May 25th – the date of these occurences and America’s unofficial start of summer – is, perhaps ironically, also observed as African Liberation Day Read More

National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth featured article

The National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth (NCFY) featured article on September 3rd, 2015 is entitled What Type of Messages Motivate Homeless Youth to Meet Their Health Needs?” Click on the link to read NCFY’s summary on “What its about… Why read it… Biggest takeaways from the research…”  conducted  and authored by Mutere, M. et al (2014) Homeless Youth Seeking Health & Life-Meaning through Popular Culture and the Arts. Child & Youth Services 35 (3): 273-287.  Read More

Homeless Youth Seeking Health & Life Meaning through Popular Culture and the Arts

Mutere, M. et al (2014). Homeless Youth Seeking Health & Life Meaning through Popular Culture and the Arts. Child & Youth Services 35 (3): 273-287

ABSTRACT: This pilot study demonstrates the roles of popular culture, media and the arts in the health and self-esteem of homeless youth. Reflecting focus group findings from a representative sample of street and sheltered youth, this paper provides a qualitative assessment of what they advocated as an effective intervention that would promote the receipt of health services within their vulnerable community. Unlike alienating disease models where adverse health behaviors and outcomes determine intervention success or failure, a culturally-sensitive approach which provided skills mentoring and engaged the youth as health advocates seemed likely to produce important recovery incentives and enhanced health outcomes. Read More