Uganda: A Multiplicity of Experiences ~ Guest Post (cont’d) written by E. N. Bisamunyu

Eli Nathan Bisamunyu (RIP ~ May 6th, 2014)

Eli Nathan Bisamunyu
(RIP ~ May 6th, 2014)

My father, Eli Nathan Bisamunyu, was born into a poor family in 1928 in a remote region of Uganda before my district’s inclusion in Her Britannic Majesty’s Protectorate of Uganda. He survived childhood diseases such as dysentery and typhus that had killed 13 of his siblings. His unexpected appearance on the scene much later compelled his mother to wish for him a different existence from that which his siblings had not survived. In a pioneering experiment she sent him to school where he distinguished himself as a six-year-old pupil amidst a throng of 15-18 year-old boys. My grandmother Rebecca had hoped that that “modern education,” as it was known, would keep him out of harm’s way. Read More

“Uganda: A Multiplicity of Experiences” ~ Guest Post written by Edward Nobel Bisamunyu

In 2009, after weeks of frustration with my Chinese students’ inability to cope with simple English texts in a science course, I encouraged them to read the China Daily. It was not equal to the entertaining stories or Andy Capp cartoons I enjoyed reading as a child in the Uganda Argus (formerly a British newspaper) thanks in large part to bedtime stories like Cinderella, Red Riding Hood, and Dr Seuss that my mother read aloud to help me overcome my own English reading difficulties. Read More

Heru/Horus… Hero

Kenyatta2When the missionaries came to Africa, they had the Bible and we had the land. They said, “Let us pray.” We closed our eyes. When we opened them, we had the Bible and they had the land. ~ Kenya’s post-colonial Father: Mzee Jomo Kenyatta, Prime Minister of Kenya (1963-64), President (1964-78), and author of “Facing Mount Kenya.” These words are sometimes attributed to South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu (Winner: Nobel Peace Prize, 1984; Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism, 1986; Pacem in Terris Award, 1987; Sydney Peace Prize, 1999; Gandhi Peace Prize, 2005; and Presidential Medal of Freedom, 2009). Read More

“How the Old Great Stories Were Created” – part 2. Guest Blogpost written by James Bonnet

This week James Bonnet explains that it’s not the historicity of the marvelous tales surrounding certain figures, but rather the “hidden truths” – which were maintained through their oral tradition accounts – that make these stories worthy…  Read More

“How the Old Great Stories Were Created.” Guest Blogpost written by James Bonnet

The old great stories, which really could change people’s lives, were not authored by individuals the way stories are today but were evolved naturally and instinctively by unconscious processes in oral traditions. And even if they started out as made-up or true stories, revelations or dreams, they still ended up for long periods of time in oral traditions and that became the principal dynamic behind their creation. Read More

Trees of Dreaming, Songlines, Story, Life…

Deep in the rain forest of western Kenya, there lived a special tree that many considered mystical. Once upon a time, her dwelling place was part of the great Equatorial African forest that once spanned the continent from east to west like a magnificent green belt that went through present-day Guinea. Her name was Mama Mutere, Read More

“An African Renaissance is Possible.” Guest Blogpost written by Molefi Kete Asante, Ph.D.

Renaissance carries with it the idea of a rebirth. Over the past ten years this term has gained ascendancy in the rhetoric of Africans who seek to restore and reconstruct societies based on the classical traditions. It was the young Cheikh Anta Diop, still in his twenties, who asked in 1948 “When shall we be able to speak of an African Renaissance?” Read More