Auset’s Star ~ Humanity’s Mystery

  • siriusSOPDET/SEPDET (Kemetic/ancient Egyptian) or SOTHIS/SIRIUS (Greek),brightest of all fixed stars, was regarded as the most important star in the sky in Kemet (ancient Egypt) forming the astronomical foundation of their religious system, delineating the rhythms and cycles by which they lived, and establishing its mysterious connection with humanity. Thus Sopdet (meaning “she who is sharp”) is said to be the cradle of human knowledge. Over twenty times brighter than our sun and twice as massive, its brilliant white color is tinged with blue and purple. All the colors of the rainbow sparkle from Sopdet (Sirius) when observed low on the horizon during certain atmospheric conditions. Some mysteries regard Sopdet as the true light and original source of all life including our sun – “shadow” of the great star – which illuminates the illusory physical world; whereas the great star, Sopdet, keeps the true spiritual world alive. Sopdet has crossed from the east bank of the Milky Way where it resided some 100,000 years ago to the west bank of the celestial Nile River where it currently rests.

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“Reparation of the African Mind” ~ GDOD (guest re-post)

gdod4When the humble among us do great things reflecting a path to the greater good for the collective, those deeds are usually the gifts inspired by the ancestral realm reminding us of their guidance, living in us. Every time we find ourselves in the past attempting to remember stories of our true selves or jump into the future imagining where we can be as a people, we come closer to the possibilities which motivate what we have to do now. Read More

Homeless Youth Seeking Health & Life Meaning through Popular Culture and the Arts

Mutere, M. et al (2014). Homeless Youth Seeking Health & Life Meaning through Popular Culture and the Arts. Child & Youth Services 35 (3): 273-287

ABSTRACT: This pilot study demonstrates the roles of popular culture, media and the arts in the health and self-esteem of homeless youth. Reflecting focus group findings from a representative sample of street and sheltered youth, this paper provides a qualitative assessment of what they advocated as an effective intervention that would promote the receipt of health services within their vulnerable community. Unlike alienating disease models where adverse health behaviors and outcomes determine intervention success or failure, a culturally-sensitive approach which provided skills mentoring and engaged the youth as health advocates seemed likely to produce important recovery incentives and enhanced health outcomes. Read More

Amun~Mut~Montu/Khonsu: The Triad of Waset

was sceptreWaset – meaning “City of the Scepter” or alternatively “City of the Set” – was the Kemetic/ancient Egyptian name of Thebes, the Greek designation for the fourth Upper Egyptian nome along Africa’s Nile River. In the religion of Kemet (meaning land of the Blacks), Set (Seth in Greek) was god of the desert, storms, disorder, violence and foreigners… the quintessential antagonist. The Was scepter on the other hand represents the power and dominion of gods, pharaohs, and priests over such an enemy presence. Amplified by amulets such as the ankh (key of life) and the djed-pillar (god’s backbone/stability), the Was scepter is a symbol of truth, order and control over the forces of chaos that Set brings in. Amun, Mut and Montu/Khonsu – commonly  referred to as the Triad of “Thebes” – are introduced in this post as a divine representative unit of dominion over chaos established in their pre-Graeco, African context of Waset. Language can act as a cultural tool and/or weapon, depending on where one is centered… Read More

Djehuti ~ Re-Membering Heaven

Djehuti

Djehuti/Thoth

“And if you wish to see the reality of this mystery, then you should see the wonderful representation of the intercourse that takes place between the male and the female… In that moment, the female receives the strength of the male; the male, for his part, receives the strength of the female… For each of them contributes its own part in begetting… And, moreover, they are holy mysteries, of both words and deeds…” ~ Djehuti, beloved consort of Ma’at (see *NOTE below) Read More

Re-Membering the Goddess

ubuntuThe influx of Divine Feminine energy in 2013, the Year of the Goddess, is about asserting her standing in Ubuntu. The Goddess brings Ma’at ~ Heavenly order, balance, justice, transformation, nurturing, wisdom, and intuition to our Earthly experience. This force is what awakens the Divine Masculine who exists in Her as She exists in Him. Ubuntu allows the power of Their intention and devotion to eliminate all those who inhabit Her realms, stealing energy and robbing souls to feed their dark agendas. In honor of our dearly departed, with this post I begin at Source…  Read More

“I AM ~ SOMEBODY!” – Graffiti as Cultural Text

"I Am - Somebody!"“I Am – Somebody!” is a praise poem to African-Americans written in the 1950s by Reverend William H. Borders, Sr., Wheat Street Baptist Church pastor and civil rights activist. The poem is most often associated with the Reverend Jesse Jackson Read More

Emcees ~ Unmasking the Trickster Deity

“With this breath I thee wed, my true nature… my forever… my being. With this breath I say ‘yes,’ and I embrace that which is real within me ~ All that is great within me; all that is beautiful; all that is self-love and gratitude; all that is divine…” (Dion Mial / Michael Bernard Beckwith – lyrics)

In Africa the word is endowed with the generative potential of a seed through the concept of nommo ~ spirit breathing life into the universe through its audible articulation or call. Read More

Master Drummers ~ The Gods Are Awake!

Mother Africa

Mother Africa

“Strummin’ my pain with his fingers, singin’ my life with his words… Killin’ me softly with his song…” (Roberta Flack).  

In Africa it is said that each person has a rhythm to which they alone dance.  Women of certain groups will gather around an expectant mother to pray and meditate until they hear “the song of the child.” Abbreviated in the name that child will be given, this song is chanted in the village to begin their education after they are born. Read More

Auset ~ Divine Mourner

Auset – (Isis in Greek) – one of the earliest and most beloved representations of the Goddess was known both as the Giver of Life and the Divine Mourner. She is the sacred model of African woman-hood and matriarchal agency who is at the genesis of life itself and its passage into the afterworld. Read More

The Language the Shulamite Cries In ~ “The Song of Songs”

“You can speak another language. You can live in another culture. But to cry over your dead, you always go back to your mother tongue… You know who a person is by the language they cry in.”
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Towards an Africa-centered and pan-African theory of Communication: Ubuntu and the oral-aesthetic perspective

rcsa20-v038-i02-coverABSTRACT ~ This article supports scholarly findings that Bantu traditions are among the strongest civilizing forces in the United States. Positing pop music as a paradigm of proof, the author argues for a cultural decolonization and corrective understanding of this expression as a manifestation of Africa’s oral traditions and the global agency of the continent’s cultural custodians. Read More