Amun~Mut~Montu/Khonsu: The Triad of Waset

was sceptreWaset – meaning “City of the Scepter” or alternatively “City of the Set” – was the Kemetic/ancient Egyptian name of Thebes, the Greek designation for the fourth Upper Egyptian nome along Africa’s Nile River. In the religion of Kemet (meaning land of the Blacks), Set (Seth in Greek) was god of the desert, storms, disorder, violence and foreigners… the quintessential antagonist. The Was scepter on the other hand represents the power and dominion of gods, pharaohs, and priests over such an enemy presence. Amplified by amulets such as the ankh (key of life) and the djed-pillar (god’s backbone/stability), the Was scepter is a symbol of truth, order and control over the forces of chaos that Set brings in. Amun, Mut and Montu/Khonsu – commonly  referred to as the Triad of “Thebes” – are introduced in this post as a divine representative unit of dominion over chaos established in their pre-Graeco, African context of Waset. Language can act as a cultural tool and/or weapon, depending on where one is centered… Read More

Djehuti ~ Re-Membering Heaven

Djehuti

Djehuti/Thoth

“And if you wish to see the reality of this mystery, then you should see the wonderful representation of the intercourse that takes place between the male and the female… In that moment, the female receives the strength of the male; the male, for his part, receives the strength of the female… For each of them contributes its own part in begetting… And, moreover, they are holy mysteries, of both words and deeds…” ~ Djehuti, beloved consort of Ma’at (see *NOTE below) Read More

Re-Membering the Goddess

ubuntuThe influx of Divine Feminine energy in 2013, the Year of the Goddess, is about asserting her standing in Ubuntu. The Goddess brings Ma’at ~ Heavenly order, balance, justice, transformation, nurturing, wisdom, and intuition to our Earthly experience. This force is what awakens the Divine Masculine who exists in Her as She exists in Him. Ubuntu allows the power of Their intention and devotion to eliminate all those who inhabit Her realms, stealing energy and robbing souls to feed their dark agendas. In honor of our dearly departed, with this post I begin at Source…  Read More

“I AM ~ SOMEBODY!” – Graffiti as Cultural Text

"I Am - Somebody!"“I Am – Somebody!” is a praise poem to African-Americans written in the 1950s by Reverend William H. Borders, Sr., Wheat Street Baptist Church pastor and civil rights activist. The poem is most often associated with the Reverend Jesse Jackson Read More

Emcees ~ Unmasking the Trickster Deity

“With this breath I thee wed, my true nature… my forever… my being. With this breath I say ‘yes,’ and I embrace that which is real within me ~ All that is great within me; all that is beautiful; all that is self-love and gratitude; all that is divine…” (Dion Mial / Michael Bernard Beckwith – lyrics)

In Africa the word is endowed with the generative potential of a seed through the concept of nommo ~ spirit breathing life into the universe through its audible articulation or call. Read More

Towards an Africa-centered and pan-African theory of Communication: Ubuntu and the oral-aesthetic perspective

rcsa20-v038-i02-coverABSTRACT ~ This article supports scholarly findings that Bantu traditions are among the strongest civilizing forces in the United States. Positing pop music as a paradigm of proof, the author argues for a cultural decolonization and corrective understanding of this expression as a manifestation of Africa’s oral traditions and the global agency of the continent’s cultural custodians. Read More

“The Language You Cry In” …oral-aesthetic musings

“Everybody come… Everyone come together… / The grave is restless. The grave is not yet at peace…” (translation)

Lorenzo Turner, a pioneering Black linguist, recognized the origin of these lines in a song he recorded in the 1930s on the south-east coast of America, sung in the Gullah dialect.  Read More

“A Reasonable African Future” ~ Guest Post written by Molefi Kete Asante, Ph.D.

Molefi Kete Asante, Ph.D. ~ Author

Over the past five hundred years or so Europe has been on a quest to destabilize and dis-establish the agency of African people. The assault has been frontal, sustained, and violent at physical and psychological levels using all dominative instruments of language, symbolism, and warfare.  The consequences of this war on Africa have been profound, giving rise to doctrines of white supremacy and black inferiority, African servility, and the negation of African civilization. Read More

Bantu Roadmaps… Random Connections

Desmond Tutu

“Africans believe in something that is difficult to render in English. We call it UBUNTU… It means the essence of being human. You know when it is there and when it is absent. It speaks about humaneness, gentleness, hospitality, putting yourself out on behalf of others, being vulnerable. It embraces compassion and toughness. It recognizes that my humanity is bound up in yours, for we can only be human together.” ~ Desmond Tutu  Read More

Heru/Horus… Hero

Kenyatta2When the missionaries came to Africa, they had the Bible and we had the land. They said, “Let us pray.” We closed our eyes. When we opened them, we had the Bible and they had the land. ~ Kenya’s post-colonial Father: Mzee Jomo Kenyatta, Prime Minister of Kenya (1963-64), President (1964-78), and author of “Facing Mount Kenya.” These words are sometimes attributed to South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu (Winner: Nobel Peace Prize, 1984; Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism, 1986; Pacem in Terris Award, 1987; Sydney Peace Prize, 1999; Gandhi Peace Prize, 2005; and Presidential Medal of Freedom, 2009). Read More

“An African Renaissance is Possible.” Guest Blogpost written by Molefi Kete Asante, Ph.D.

Renaissance carries with it the idea of a rebirth. Over the past ten years this term has gained ascendancy in the rhetoric of Africans who seek to restore and reconstruct societies based on the classical traditions. It was the young Cheikh Anta Diop, still in his twenties, who asked in 1948 “When shall we be able to speak of an African Renaissance?” Read More