music and its dance ~ an Africa-centered s/hero's journey perspective

Archive for the ‘Afrocentricity’ Category

Adinkra ~ Symbols of African Wisdom

SANKOFA

SANKOFA

ADINKRA are ancient visual symbols created by the Akan of Ghana that represent and convey essential cultural concepts, values and traditional wisdom. As such, each Adinkra often has a corresponding proverb which imbues the symbol with rich meaning. According to Akan oral tradition, Adinkra images came into existence in the early 1800s as a design element on fabric. Traditionally Adinkra cloths were only worn by royalty and spiritual leaders on special occasions such as funerals. (more…)

Proverbs from the Luxor Temple of Amun~Mut~Montu/Khonsu

Luxor Temple entrance

“KNOW THY SELF” is one of the cardinal concepts in ancient African sacred wisdom which underlie many of the Proverbs that are inscribed into the walls of the Temple of Luxor in Egypt. There are six great temples in that area, the most renowned being Karnak and Luxor – both headed by Amun – which are on the east bank of Africa’s sacred Nile River at the fourth Upper nome in Waset (Thebes in Greek). Built during the New Kingdom, the Luxor Temple was dedicated to the Kemetic Sacred Triad: Amun~Mut~Montu/Khonsu (more…)

“Reparation of the African Mind” ~ GDOD (guest re-post)

gdod4When the humble among us do great things reflecting a path to the greater good for the collective, those deeds are usually the gifts inspired by the ancestral realm reminding us of their guidance, living in us. Every time we find ourselves in the past attempting to remember stories of our true selves or jump into the future imagining where we can be as a people, we come closer to the possibilities which motivate what we have to do now. (more…)

Amun~Mut~Montu/Khonsu: The Triad of Waset

was sceptreWaset – meaning “City of the Scepter” or alternatively “City of the Set” – was the Kemetic/ancient Egyptian name of Thebes, the Greek designation for the fourth Upper Egyptian nome along Africa’s Nile River. In the religion of Kemet (meaning land of the Blacks), Set (Seth in Greek) was god of the desert, storms, disorder, violence and foreigners… the quintessential antagonist. The Was scepter on the other hand represents the power and dominion of gods, pharaohs, and priests over such an enemy presence. Amplified by amulets such as the ankh (key of life) and the djed-pillar (god’s backbone/stability), the Was scepter is a symbol of truth, order and control over the forces of chaos that Set brings in. Amun, Mut and Montu/Khonsu – commonly  referred to as the Triad of “Thebes” – are introduced in this post as a divine representative unit of dominion over chaos established in their pre-Graeco, African context of Waset. Language can act as a cultural tool and/or weapon, depending on where one is centered… (more…)

Djehuti ~ Re-Membering Heaven

Djehuti

Djehuti/Thoth

“And if you wish to see the reality of this mystery, then you should see the wonderful representation of the intercourse that takes place between the male and the female… In that moment, the female receives the strength of the male; the male, for his part, receives the strength of the female… For each of them contributes its own part in begetting… And, moreover, they are holy mysteries, of both words and deeds…” ~ Djehuti, beloved consort of Ma’at (see *NOTE below) (more…)

Re-Membering the Goddess

ubuntuThe influx of Divine Feminine energy in 2013, the Year of the Goddess, is about asserting her standing in Ubuntu. The Goddess brings Ma’at ~ Heavenly order, balance, justice, transformation, nurturing, wisdom, and intuition to our Earthly experience. This force is what awakens the Divine Masculine who exists in Her as She exists in Him. Ubuntu allows the power of Their intention and devotion to eliminate all those who inhabit Her realms, stealing energy and robbing souls to feed their dark agendas. In honor of our dearly departed, with this post I begin at Source…  (more…)

“I AM ~ SOMEBODY!” – Graffiti as Cultural Text

"I Am - Somebody!"“I Am – Somebody!” is a praise poem to African-Americans written in the 1950s by Reverend William H. Borders, Sr., Wheat Street Baptist Church pastor and civil rights activist. The poem is most often associated with the Reverend Jesse Jackson (more…)

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